FYI:  I just checked, and I got 4466 words written yesterday thanks to you guys.  You rock.

rena-librarian:

morgan-mclovin:

lay1306:

desperatembrace:

purrityring:

unverified-reality:

This x-ray shows the case of an unfortunate woman who happened to have a snake crawl into her vagina, slither through the fallopian tube, and out oast the ovary into her body cavity. It survived unknown for three days until the snake started eating her appendix.

my anaconda dont

Can i just say—hoW DO YOU NOT NOTICE THAT??

probably thought it was just cramps

Cramps?? hoW DO YOU NOT FEEL A FUCKING SNAKE CRAWL INTO YOU

Female here, gotta say…I can see where the inside pain could be mistaken for cramps but seriously how do you nOT FEEL A FUCKING SNAKE SLITHERING UP YOUR VAGINA

Post originally comes from unverified-reality:  “Really real unverified facts about reality.  Really.”
So she didn’t feel it because it didn’t happen.  Basically.
(Check your sources, guys, c’mon.)

rena-librarian:

morgan-mclovin:

lay1306:

desperatembrace:

purrityring:

unverified-reality:

This x-ray shows the case of an unfortunate woman who happened to have a snake crawl into her vagina, slither through the fallopian tube, and out oast the ovary into her body cavity. It survived unknown for three days until the snake started eating her appendix.

my anaconda dont

Can i just say—hoW DO YOU NOT NOTICE THAT??

probably thought it was just cramps

Cramps?? hoW DO YOU NOT FEEL A FUCKING SNAKE CRAWL INTO YOU

Female here, gotta say…I can see where the inside pain could be mistaken for cramps but seriously how do you nOT FEEL A FUCKING SNAKE SLITHERING UP YOUR VAGINA

Post originally comes from unverified-reality:  “Really real unverified facts about reality.  Really.”

So she didn’t feel it because it didn’t happen.  Basically.

(Check your sources, guys, c’mon.)

(Source: malformalady)

kiashyel:

gwydionmisha:

ahsimwithsake:

claraxbarton:

motherfuckingshakespeare:

eighttwotwopointthreethree:

baldymonster:

cleolinda:

killjoyfeminist:

annabellioncourt:

plz-no:

Simultaneously the worst and best movie ever made

Actually one of my teachers watched every single version of Romeo and Juliet with the original text in front of him to prove that this was the worst version, but to his great dismay its the most accurate film adaptation of it, with the lines closest to the original text and most similar stage direction and relayed emotions.

He proceeded to show it to us in class.

Dude, seriously.  This version is actually very accurate.

My Shakespeare professor in grad school said the same thing.

I think most Shakespeare movies are just so classy and highbrow with their gorgeous period costumes and mandatory snooty elocutionary accents that people forget how goofy this play actually is. The lines, the characters, the motivations, the babyfaced teen stars, I just… oh my god it’s all so real. I’ve heard a lot of people blast Baz Luhrmann for making such a campy adaptation and it’s just like no, you don’t understand, that was all Shakespeare.

Sometimes I wonder if the real reason it’s disliked is because it was so damn popular with teenage girls.

hey shakesankle and alltheweirdkidsinoneplace

"Sometimes I wonder if the real reason it’s disliked is because it -was so damn popular with teenage girls."

Probably since almost everything that’s popular with teenage girls is devalued and put down. I might try streaming this or something if people want to watch it? 

Actually this is my favorite adaptation and I have always shown/references this in classes.

Partly because it WAS so popular with teenaged girls. Partly because I was a teenaged girl when it came out. Partly because it’s an incredibly faithful adaptation.

But mostly because it’s fucking awesome.

The thing most people forget is that Shakespeare wasn’t writing SHAKESPEARE. He was writing pop culture for mass consumption. It wasn’t highbrow. It was bawdy and the actors changed lines and joked with the audience and the plays are full of snide social commentary that would have been appreciated by the contemporary Tudor audience.

Which is exactly what Baz did with his R and J.

The beautiful thing about this adaptation is that it really shows what Shakespeare was doing.  Theatre wasn’t considered an art until after Shakespeare death.  The fact that we have the first folio is almost accidental;the other company members wanted to do something in his memories and paid through the nose to get all of the plays he had worked on printed (which involved scrounging up all the actors’ copies).  Printing was EXPENSIVE and reserved almost exclusively for poetry and real literary art.  Which plays were not.

Plays were concerts.  They were media for the masses, mainly created for the groundlings (the audience members standing directly on the ground in front of the stage, who had an insane power over the actors ad playwrights because if they didn’t like something, they’d let you know it!)  Royalty went to them, of course, and Shakespeare had some powerful patrons.  But no one really considered it ART the way we do.

Which is why this film is so successful and important.  It shows what it is and also what it does.  Because this is a tragic and beautiful adaptation, even while its wild and bright and silly.  It captures perfectly the twist of this play—the fact that until act 3, this was most definitely a comedy—and the raw emotion that connected not only with the groundlings but with the lords and ladies and nobles that filled the upper seats as well.

Also, the directorial decisions made in this film regarding costume, character motivations, MERCUTIO.. it’s just phenomenal.

I was an adult and a teacher when this came out and my lover and I went the opening weekend.  At the end he asked what I thought.  I still remember turning to him and saying, “Shakespeare would have loved it.”  I stand by that.  It captures the tone and energy of the play.  It grabs the audience by the throat with the opener, the way it was meant to do.  Theater was out of doors with no microphone and a lot of the Groundlings were drunk and often arguing.  The opening lines needed to get everyone’s attention and snatch it away from conversations, and orange girls, and the incipient brawl down in front and focus it on the stage.  So much of the acting in this is brilliant, and it really is extremely accurate as far as dialog and tone.  In Shakespeare’s time a lot of the costumes were hand me down clothes from patrons, I. E: Contemporary (or slightly out of date) fashion.  Putting it in contemporary dress makes it more like the original experience. 

I loved  watching the teenafers excited ahead of us, discussing the movie excitedly.  I knew it would be a hit.  I was glad.  I was overjoyed to see so many students eager to watch it again and again.  I was happy my kids were excited about a Shakespeare movie.  It had people reading and discussing the plays on their own time and thinking about them.

I think it’s better to see the plays as they are instead of putting them on a high art pedestal.  They are often deeply flawed (Racism, Sexism, plot holes, etc.) but also frequently beautiful, funny, dirty, and profound by turns.  Some of them are a lot better than others.  It’s okay to find Titus Andronicus a clunky mess.  It’s okay to notice what idiots many of the characters in Romeo and Juliet are (not Mercutio, I love Mercutio, but that Friar?  Romeo?).  It’s okay to find some of the histories dull, and some of the comedies so light that there is noting much there.  It’s okay to get a little bored with Lear.  Watching the plays is a lot more fun and interesting if you take the dirty jokes along with the poetry and let yourself feel what you feel instead of what you are pressured to feel.

This is my favorite Romeo and Juliet. I grew up pre-internet, when researching stuff meant going to the library and then wishing, hoping, and praying they had a book relevant to what you wanted.  Shakespeare intrigued me when I was in grade school, but I didn’t fully understand the text and supplemental materials were no help because everything at my library was at least 60 years out of date. When I saw it this version of Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare suddenly clicked for me. The light bulb came on and everything made sense. This version is garish and loud and neon and incredibly, painfully 90s, but I will always love it because it brought me an understanding of works which had previously seemed unfathomable.

Also, my absolute favorite college professor, an amazing, wonderful, and brilliant Literature professor who used to debate with me whether The Lion King was more Hamlet or Henry IV, had the poster for this movie hanging in his office (along with a poster for the Fellowship of the Ring) and he and I would geek-out together over how much we loved the film. So it forever has a place in my heart because I, essentially, got to fangirl about R&J with Dr. Head, a man who’s opinion I respected and greatly admired and who, by being just as excited to learn as he was to teach, taught me so much about the awesome power of words.

(Source: fuckyeah-chickflicks, via rena-librarian)

roses-in-december said: Next?

Sentence one: 

It should be a relief.

Sentence two:

I am going to bed now.  I will make more sentences in the morning.

(On the one hand, I am close to finishing Chapter Seven and starting Chapter Eight.  On the other hand:  NOT CHAPTER EIGHT NOOOOO)

hedgerose said: NEXT! :D (you can also save this for motivation next time.)

One last sentence:

"Guess we never did get around to that next drink."

“When did you come here? The island. What was the date?” — ”It was September 22nd.” — "I think I crashed your plane."

(Source: britneyslost, via wehaveto-goback)

I will not nitpick this article to death I will not nitpick this article to death I will not nitpick this article to death

(Seriously it’s Word of God that Walt was using the computer, presumably because it got him out of Room 23 and that the outrigger fight actually involved survivors of the Black Rock and it’s actual fucking canon that Daniel couldn’t have built the Lamp Post because it was built in the late 1960s — 1970 at the very outside — and he didn’t get stuck in the past until 1974 and Miles’s flashback episode is all about how badly he wanted to find his father’s grave which was ON THE DAMN ISLAND and how the fuck can you talk about the people responsible for the Purge and miss the fact that Widmore was THE FUCKING LEADER when it happened did you even watch this show more than once I doubt it.)

(Fucking fake geek boys, I tell you.)

So I’m pretty sure I got more asks from that one post than I have from any other writing meme I’ve ever posted.  Moral of the story:  if you’re struggling, don’t ask for people to think of prompts.  Just let them shout “Next!” at you until they get worn out.

I love you guys.  Even if there were were a couple moments when I was like “Oh God, no more asks.”

sarahvernons:

THIS DAY IN HISTORY:

SEPTEMBER 22

Oceanic Airlines Flight 815, was a scheduled flight from Sydney, Australia to Los Angeles, United States, on a Boeing 777. On September 22, 2004, the airliner, carrying 324 passengers, deviated from its original course and disappeared somewhere over the Pacific Ocean. 

Two months after the crash, wreckage was found in the Sunda Trench in the Indian Ocean near Bali. With the discovery of the plane, all of the passengers were presumed dead. However, weeks later, six survivors of the crash, including a 5 week old baby were found drifting in a small life boat near the Island of Sumba and became known as the Oceanic Six.

(via oceanic815crash)